Simone Ross

On assignment as a children's nurse in Uganda

Simone Ross (Cap Anamur nurse) plays with a severely, multiply disabled street child.
Simone Ross (Cap Anamur nurse) plays with a severely, multiply disabled street child.

Name

Simone Ross

Age

35 years old

Profession

Pediatric Nurse

Last country of operation

Uganda

Duration of mission

6 months

Previous projects with Cap Anamur:

Sierra Leone (2015 and 2017)

My everyday life in the project:

I spent most of the day in the emergency room of the hospital in. When there wasn’t an emergency, I participated in the day-to-day routine patient care.
Once things were quiet in the ER, I enjoyed visiting the infant and pediatric wards, and helping out there. In addition, together with the team, I took care of the pharmacy orders and deliveries, prepared and conducted staff training for the local specialists, optimized structures and workflows, organized materials for the laboratory and simply did what was needed at the time. That’s exactly the beauty of working on the project: it’s always very versatile and varied. Towards evening there was usually time for “office work” on the computer or other administrative things.

Once or twice a month, we made supply trips to the capital city of Kampala to make purchase things like food, materials, and medicines that we could not get in the village.

Dr. Werner Strahl (2nd from right, Chairman of Cap Anamur) in conversation with Dr. Nellie Bell (left, pediatrician and deputy hospital director) at Ola During Children's Hospital in Freetown. Also present: Dennis Wellmann (right, Pikin Paddy project manager) and pediatric nurse Simone Ross (2nd from left).
Dr. Werner Strahl (2nd from right, Chairman of Cap Anamur) in conversation with Dr. Nellie Bell (left, pediatrician and deputy hospital director) at Ola During Children's Hospital in Freetown. Also present: Dennis Wellmann (right, Pikin Paddy project manager) and pediatric nurse Simone Ross (2nd from left).

My spare time at the project:

The security situation in Uganda is very good, so you could move freely. So a walk through the village and the neighborhood, to the market or to the local pub with colleagues was perfectly doable.
Uganda is an incredibly green and beautiful country. Uganda is an incredibly lush and beautiful country. Other than that, I read a lot, listened to the radio over the Internet, and of course kept in touch with family and friends.

I particularly appreciated:

The close cooperation with local colleagues on site and the openness and friendliness with which I was received by the hospital team.
Despite the poverty and partly difficult conditions in the country, I found the Ugandans very humorous and could often laugh with them.

I especcially missed:

If I am completely honest: Nothing, actually.

You can very well do without most things for a short period of six months, be it your favorite food or your usual leisure activities.

And thanks to the Internet, you’re always in very close contact with family and friends.

My plans for the future:

Finding the right balance between project assignments and my life in Germany.

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