Factfinding tour of the Bezaha team: Silke Schopf, right, nurse and Andreas Zuckerlas, 2nd from right, organizer, architect and technician) together with Dr. Werner Höfner (left, doctor and vice chairman of Cap Anamur) along with a nun on the way to the health station in Belamoty.

Our work

Helping where it is needed, sustainably and efficiently.

Cap Anamur outreach worldwide

Current projects

Completed projects

Since its foundation, Cap Anamur has adhered to the principle of helping where it is needed.

Since 1979 - over 40 years of humanitarian aid

62 Countries in which aid was provided

300 projects implemented worldwide

Current projects

Nothing found.

Completed projects

Angola

Elfenbeinküste

Elfenbeinküste

Haiti

Haiti

Indonesien

Indonesien

Irak

Irak

Kenia

Kenia

Kolumbien

Kolumbien

Kongo

Kongo

Kosovo

Kosovo

Liberia

Liberia

Madagaskar

Madagaskar

Mosambik

Mosambik

Nepal

Nepal

Nordkorea

Nordkorea

Pakistan

Pakistan

Philippinen

Philippinen

Serbien

Serbien

Syrien

Syrien

Somalia

Somalia

Tschetschenien

Tschetschenien

Uganda

Uganda

Chronology of a project

Success and impact monitoring

In all its projects, Cap Anamur pursues a course of action that focuses in particular on the sustainable impact of all its interventions. Regardless of the situation, structures found in the crisis regions are used and expanded for long-term use. The permanent monitoring of the work processes during the assignments, and the respectful accompaniment of the responsible persons on site far beyond the duration of the project, allow us a permanent evaluation of success.

01. Before project start: evaluation trip

The grounds for humanitarian operations in a disaster area or crisis region can vary widely. The same applies to the needs of people in distress around the world: from acute medical aid to the reconstruction of destroyed buildings, to professional training and education, people’s needs can always be different. As a rule, Cap Anamur therefore first sends a team of experts who:

  • evaluate the situation on the ground,
  • formulate appropriate objectives for the mission,
  • and then develop effective options for action.

Based on these results, we begin our projects focused on the most urgent and meaningful points from the very first minute, with the goal of meeting the various emergencies in the best possible way.

02. Utilization of existing structures

New projects are always carefully implemented into pre-existing conditions. The mere overlaying of regional conditions with a temporary relief action, which is then snatched away from the local people once the project is completed, can thus be ruled out. The mere overlaying of regional conditions with a temporary relief action, which is then snatched away from the local people once the project is completed, can thus be ruled out.

  • In this way, we succeed in integrating local craftsmen, doctors and nurses into the project from the very beginning.
  • Available buildings and equipment are also made available for work.
  • Necessary building materials are purchased from local suppliers and transported in cooperation with local logistics companies.

Thus, together with the affected population, we reconstruct and expand a functioning system that can continue to be used long after the project is completed.

03. Staff training

If local doctors and nurses lack sufficient professional qualifications, our employees conduct intensive staff training.

The range of courses on offer is very broad and is geared to the knowledge gaps of the learners: Starting with instruction in the use of new medical or technical equipment and ending with three years of training leading to a state-certified degree.

In accordance with the principle of “helping people to help themselves,” this enables local staff to make diagnoses and carry out appropriate treatments on their own.

Das Cap Anamur-Team (v.r.: Jürgen Maul (Organisator), Philippe Valentin (Krankenpfleger), Anabela Valentin (Krankenschwester), Anil Sapkota (Koordinator) unterwegs im Bergdorf Judeegaun.
04. Project handover

As soon as the job can be done completely by the local population, we organize the gradual transfer of the projects into local hands.

  • Even after the departure of our employees, the projects are not left to themselves, but continue to be accompanied by us.
  • This is done by means of regular on-site visits, delivery of medicines and financial support for special expenses that cannot be borne alone, such as the purchase of medical equipment.
  • We maintain contact with local decision-makers even years after the project has ended.

This approach has proven to be a successful and sustainably effective method of implementing projects in a controlled manner.

Das Cap Anamur-Team (v.r.: Jürgen Maul (Organisator), Philippe Valentin (Krankenpfleger), Anabela Valentin (Krankenschwester), Anil Sapkota (Koordinator) unterwegs im Bergdorf Judeegaun.
01. Before project start: evaluation trip

The grounds for humanitarian operations in a disaster area or crisis region can vary widely. The same applies to the needs of people in distress around the world: from acute medical aid to the reconstruction of destroyed buildings, to professional training and education, people’s needs can always be different. As a rule, Cap Anamur therefore first sends a team of experts who:

  • evaluate the situation on the ground,
  • formulate appropriate objectives for the mission,
  • and then develop effective options for action.

Based on these results, we begin our projects focused on the most urgent and meaningful points from the very first minute, with the goal of meeting the various emergencies in the best possible way.

Factfinding tour of the Bezaha team: Silke Schopf, left, nurse and Andreas Zuckerlas, center, organizer, architect and technician) talking to Dr. Gaston (right) in the cyclone-damaged maternité, which belongs to the health station CSB 2 (Centre de Base 2) in Belamoty.
02. Utilization of existing structures

New projects are always carefully implemented into pre-existing conditions. The mere overlaying of regional conditions with a temporary relief action, which is then snatched away from the local people once the project is completed, can thus be ruled out. The mere overlaying of regional conditions with a temporary relief action, which is then snatched away from the local people once the project is completed, can thus be ruled out.

  • In this way, we succeed in integrating local craftsmen, doctors and nurses into the project from the very beginning.
  • Available buildings and equipment are also made available for work.
  • Necessary building materials are purchased from local suppliers and transported in cooperation with local logistics companies.

Thus, together with the affected population, we reconstruct and expand a functioning system that can continue to be used long after the project is completed.

Teaching midwifery and nursing classes. Hands-on obstetrics education with mannequins.
03. Staff training

If local doctors and nurses lack sufficient professional qualifications, our employees conduct intensive staff training.

The range of courses on offer is very broad and is geared to the knowledge gaps of the learners: Starting with instruction in the use of new medical or technical equipment and ending with three years of training leading to a state-certified degree.

In accordance with the principle of “helping people to help themselves,” this enables local staff to make diagnoses and carry out appropriate treatments on their own.

Rounding on the pediatric ward: Dr. Judith Große Sudhues (right) and Onwoding Herbert (center, doctor in training).
04. Project handover

As soon as the job can be done completely by the local population, we organize the gradual transfer of the projects into local hands.

  • Even after the departure of our employees, the projects are not left to themselves, but continue to be accompanied by us.
  • This is done by means of regular on-site visits, delivery of medicines and financial support for special expenses that cannot be borne alone, such as the purchase of medical equipment.
  • We maintain contact with local decision-makers even years after the project has ended.

This approach has proven to be a successful and sustainably effective method of implementing projects in a controlled manner.

Enable our relief efforts

Donate now and effectively support Cap Anamur projects worldwide.

Our projects are financed exclusively by private donations. This is why we are able to intervene quickly and unbureaucratically in acute emergency situations, such as wars or natural disasters, completely independently of state institutions.

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