Sarah Schütz

On assignment as a midwife in the Central African Republic

Sarah Schütz (right, midwife, Cap Anamur) on the road with a colleague in Bossombélé District Hospital. © Jürgen Escher.
Sarah Schütz (right, midwife, Cap Anamur) on the road with a colleague in Bossombélé District Hospital. © Jürgen Escher.

Name

Sarah Schütz

Age

27 years old

Profession

Midwife

Country of operation

Central African Republic

Duration of mission

6 months

My everyday life in the project

We do morning rounds, then I stay in the maternité and do consultation hours with the matrônes for any kind of gynecological complaints and questions. At the same time, there is a consultation for pregnant women, led by an assistant accoucheuse, and if questions arise there, I am also the contact person for them. Of course, I am also present at births. Around noon, I eat together with my colleague, and then the afternoon rounds take place, again. I am also available throughout in obstetrical emergencies, since we live on the hospital grounds. One is called in the night, with questions about cesarean sections, uterine ruptures or trapped placenta. I also accompanied rounds in all the other services (pediatrics, surgery, and internal).

What do you like most about your work?

In this case, I particularly liked the exchange with the staff on site in the delivery room. I really enjoyed working with them. I found it impressive how the women give birth to their child without any kind of anaesthetics. I also found it nice to see how the Matrônes developed further in their work through our exchange.

Central African Republic: Sarah Schütz (right, midwife, Cap Anamur) on rounds at Bossombélé District Hospital.
Central African Republic: Sarah Schütz (right, midwife, Cap Anamur) on rounds at Bossombélé District Hospital. © Jürgen Escher.

Reasons why you work for Cap Anamur:

I find the idea of a small NGO more familial than a large apparatus like the UN or MSF (Doctors Without Borders).

Some memories or special moments:

I remember a premature birth of twins by Maimuna (mother’s name), she directly understood that it was dire for her children and fought so hard for their survival. She pumped milk, gave milk independently through the feeding tube, and understood that the oxygen tubes were especially vital for her daughter’s survival. The family took turns with the kangaroo method to keep the kids warm. Unfortunately, her daughter didn’t make it. However, her son did progress wonderfully. That motivation and willpower of Maimuna was just incredibly impressive.

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